Case Snapshot
Case ID: 18411
Classification: Hoarding
Animal: horse, rodent/small mammal (pet), goat
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Wednesday, Aug 10, 2011

County: Carroll

Disposition: Alleged

Alleged: Woman

The New Hampshire SPCA assisted Wakefield police Wednesday in conducting an investigation of an animal cruelty complaint. Wakefield police executed a search warrant and found five horses suffering from hunger and neglect.

Also rescued were a goat and two ferrets.

The owner of the horses has been known to the NHSPCA and the police for past animal cruelty, with four horses having been removed from the property in 2010 in a similar condition. Those taken on Wednesday had been in good condition at that time.

NHSPCA Field Services Manager Steve Sprowl said he notified the owner at that time that if she were to get to the point where she couldn't care for them, she could call and he would intervene before the situation turned into a case of cruelty.

The owner never called for help. She has now voluntarily surrendered the two horses, two miniature horses, a pony, goat and two ferrets.

The horses' owner surrendered the animals, saying she had gotten in over her head. She claimed she couldn't afford to feed the animals.

The animals will be given a complete medical exam by a licensed veterinarian on Friday but are visibly emaciated with hips and ribs plainly visible, according to the release from the Stratham SPCA.

"Their hooves are long and in poor condition, they haven't seen a farrier in a long time," said Suzanne Bryant, Farm Animal Coordinator of the New Hampshire SPCA. "We believe they are all suffering from internal parasites."

The NHSPCA is feeding the animals cautiously in hopes of helping them regain their strength, while trying to guard against re-feeder syndrome and colic.

Both are dangerous, sometimes life-threatening conditions which are brought on by feeding too quickly an animal that has become severely malnourished. The miniature horses are in the worst condition and will be closely monitored.

Although the horses are now in good hands and are beginning to get their bearings, they will require veterinary care, weight gain, farrier services and time to recuperate.

The goat from this case joins five other goats in the shelter's care. The five came from the town of Meredith, where there were nine stray goats roaming around town and eluding capture.

The Town of Meredith requested the NHSPCA's help in capturing them and when no owner could be located the town surrendered them to the NHSPCA. Now healthy and castrated, the goats are available for adoption.

The New Hampshire SPCA is asking the community for its support in caring for these and other rescued animals. Individuals and companies wishing to help with the food, supplies, medical treatment, etc. can make a tax deductible contribution to the NHSPCA.

Donations should be directed to the SOS Fund and can be made via the website at www.nhspca.org, by phone at (603) 772-2921, x106 or by mail to SOS Fund, PO Box 196, Stratham NH 03885.

The New Hampshire SPCA is a community resource center that provides animal adoption, education, investigation and sheltering services in a professional and compassionate way.

The Adoption Center is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday; 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday, and closed on Wednesday.

For more information about the NHSPCA, visit www.nhspca.org.

References

« NH State Animal Cruelty Map
« More cases in Carroll County, NH

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