Case Snapshot
Case ID: 20102
Classification: Mutilation/Torture
Animal: cat
More cases in Bay County, MI
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Animal was offleash or loose
Reward: $5,000
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Friday, Jan 9, 2015

County: Bay

Disposition: Open
Case Images: 2 files available

Suspect(s) Unknown - We need your help!

Case Updates: 1 update(s) available

Investigators are continuing to search for the culprit who recently blinded a young stray cat discovered in Bay County's Bangor Township, and they're hoping a sizable reward provides some leads.

The feline named Ace on Friday, Jan. 9, was found on the porch of Amanda Breasbois-Schulz, frozen and with significant damage to both of his eyes. Breasbois-Schulz took the neutered stray to Veterinary Health Center, 305 N. Center Road in Saginaw Township, where veterinarian Dr. Tina Roggenbeck performed a 45-minute surgery requiring the removal of both of Ace's eyes.

In Roggenbeck's expert opinion, Ace's wounds were deliberately inflicted and not the result of another animal's attack or an accident such as being struck by a car.

Mike Halstead, director of Bay County Animal Control, said his employees have been investigating the matter since learning of it on Tuesday, Jan. 13.

"We sent two Animal Control officers to canvass the neighborhood in hopes someone witnessed or knew by word of mouth who the perpetrator might be," Halstead said. "However, that was unsuccessful. (Thursday) morning, I contacted Jill Fritz (director of the Humane Society of the United States' Michigan branch) and we're going to be forwarding everything we have to her at this point, in the hopes that the Humane Society will see fit to offer a reward for the perpetrator of this action.

"We're hoping if a person's moral turpitude doesn't dictate that they tell us what they know in our canvass, perhaps the financial incentive will."

Fritz said Thursday that her agency received the information from Halstead and that the Michigan branch of the Humane Society of the United States is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to the identification, arrest and conviction of the person or persons who injured Ace.

Roggenbeck on Jan. 12 sent an email to Animal Control, the Bay County Board of Commissioners, and the Humane Society of Bay County, outlining her findings in Ace's case.

Bay County Executive Thomas L. Hickner on Jan. 13 replied to the email, stating in part, "Please be assured we share your outrage at the violence which resulted in the cruelty toward this animal. Since learning yesterday of the incident, staff of Bay County Animal Control have been conducting a thorough investigation into the matter to attempt to obtain the identity of the perpetrator and the circumstances surrounding the act so we may refer the matter to the Bay County Prosecutor."

Jeannie Wolicki-Nicholas, president of the local Humane Society's Board of Directors, shared Hickner's disdain for Ace's treatment. She cited the empirically-supported belief that there is a link between violence toward animals and humans as an added reason to identify Ace's abuser.

"Animal abuse is a dress rehearsal for the future and we need to take this very seriously," she said. "I certainly hope whoever knows about this situation comes forward so the person who could do such a horrendous act can get the help he needs."

Roggenbeck, through the nonprofit organization Angels Among Us, is offering a $500 reward as well. Ace, though, is convalescing well at Roggenbeck's clinic and is quite ambulatory and friendly despite the severity of his wounds. Though the doctor has received numerous offers to adopt him, she plans to either take him home herself or give him to a trusted client of hers, she said.

Investigators are encouraging anyone who has knowledge of the conduct that befell Ace to call them at 989-894-0679.

"We're staying on top of it and hopefully we'll turn something up," Halstead said.

If you have information on this case, please contact:
Bay County Animal Control
989-894-0679


Case Updates

Investigators are continuing to search for the culprit who recently blinded a young stray cat discovered in Bay County's Bangor Township, and they're hoping a sizable reward provides some leads.

The feline named Ace on Friday, Jan. 9, was found on the porch of Amanda Breasbois-Schulz, frozen and with significant damage to both of his eyes. Breasbois-Schulz took the neutered stray to Veterinary Health Center, 305 N. Center Road in Saginaw Township, where veterinarian Dr. Tina Roggenbeck performed a 45-minute surgery requiring the removal of both of Ace's eyes.

In Roggenbeck's expert opinion, Ace's wounds were deliberately inflicted and not the result of another animal's attack or an accident such as being struck by a car.

Mike Halstead, director of Bay County Animal Control, said his employees have been investigating the matter since learning of it on Tuesday, Jan. 13.

"We sent two Animal Control officers to canvass the neighborhood in hopes someone witnessed or knew by word of mouth who the perpetrator might be," Halstead said. "However, that was unsuccessful. (Thursday) morning, I contacted Jill Fritz (director of the Humane Society of the United States' Michigan branch) and we're going to be forwarding everything we have to her at this point, in the hopes that the Humane Society will see fit to offer a reward for the perpetrator of this action.

"We're hoping if a person's moral turpitude doesn't dictate that they tell us what they know in our canvass, perhaps the financial incentive will."

Fritz said Thursday that her agency received the information from Halstead and that the Michigan branch of the Humane Society of the United States is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to the identification, arrest and conviction of the person or persons who injured Ace.

Roggenbeck on Jan. 12 sent an email to Animal Control, the Bay County Board of Commissioners, and the Humane Society of Bay County, outlining her findings in Ace's case.

Bay County Executive Thomas L. Hickner on Jan. 13 replied to the email, stating in part, "Please be assured we share your outrage at the violence which resulted in the cruelty toward this animal. Since learning yesterday of the incident, staff of Bay County Animal Control have been conducting a thorough investigation into the matter to attempt to obtain the identity of the perpetrator and the circumstances surrounding the act so we may refer the matter to the Bay County Prosecutor."

Jeannie Wolicki-Nicholas, president of the local Humane Society's Board of Directors, shared Hickner's disdain for Ace's treatment. She cited the empirically-supported belief that there is a link between violence toward animals and humans as an added reason to identify Ace's abuser.

"Animal abuse is a dress rehearsal for the future and we need to take this very seriously," she said. "I certainly hope whoever knows about this situation comes forward so the person who could do such a horrendous act can get the help he needs."

Roggenbeck, through the nonprofit organization Angels Among Us, is offering a $500 reward as well. Ace, though, is convalescing well at Roggenbeck's clinic and is quite ambulatory and friendly despite the severity of his wounds. Though the doctor has received numerous offers to adopt him, she plans to either take him home herself or give him to a trusted client of hers, she said.

Investigators are encouraging anyone who has knowledge of the conduct that befell Ace to call them at 989-894-0679.

"We're staying on top of it and hopefully we'll turn something up," Halstead said.
Source: mLive - Jan 16, 2014
Update posted on Aug 21, 2015 - 3:05PM 

References

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